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The 11 Best Landmine Exercises for a Full-Body Workout


Landmine exercises are a great way to add variety and challenge to your fitness routine. 

In this article, you’ll learn what landmine exercises are, why they’re beneficial, how to use a landmine attachment, the best landmine exercise for your entire body, how to set up a makeshift landmine if you don’t have access to a landmine station, and more.  

What Are Landmine Exercises?

A landmine exercise is a strength training exercise that involves using a barbell anchored at one end in a “landmine attachment,” a piece of equipment consisting of a metal sleeve with a pivoting joint usually attached to the floor or the base of a squat or power rack.

Landmine attachments allow the bar to move in multiple directions on a set, “arcing” bar path, enabling you to perform a variety of exercises for your entire body.

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Benefits of Barbell Landmine Exercises

Before diving into the best landmine exercises, let’s first understand the benefits of incorporating them into your fitness regimen. Here are some key advantages:

1. Full-body engagement

Most landmine exercises train multiple muscle groups simultaneously. This saves time, improves overall coordination, and allows you to practice using your body as a single unit, helping you build functional strength that translates well to sports and everyday activities.

2. Joint-friendly

Landmine exercises put less stress on your joints than other forms of strength training. The fixed bar path and controlled range of motion reduce the risk of injury, making it an ideal choice for beginners or those with joint issues.

3. Core stability

Many landmine exercises require stabilization of the core muscles, promoting better balance and posture. By challenging your core, you can improve overall stability and reduce the risk of back pain.

4. Versatility

Landmine exercises allow you to train in a variety of ways. You can perform exercises standing, kneeling, or even lying down, allowing for endless variations to keep your workouts interesting and challenging.

5. Improved grip strength

Unlike traditional barbell exercises where you grip the bar, landmine exercises often involve holding the barbell’s thicker sleeve, which requires and builds a stronger, more resilient grip. 

A strong grip is essential for lifting heavy weights but also has practical benefits in daily life.

How to Use a Landmine Attachment

Landmine training is easy to set up. Follow these quick steps to get started:

The Best Landmine Exercises for Your Whole Body

Now that we understand their benefits, let’s explore some of the best landmine exercises you can incorporate into your landmine full-body workout routines:

1. Landmine Front Squat

The landmine front squat is a compound exercise that primarily targets the lower body, including the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes

How to Do It: 

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell facing the landmine attachment.
  2. Take a shoulder-width stance with your toe pointing slightly out.
  3. Hold the free end of the barbell with both hands at chest height. 
  4. Sit down into a squat, keeping your back flat and knees in line with your toes.
  5. Return to a standing position.

2. Landmine Romanian Deadlift

The landmine Romanian deadlift is an excellent exercise for training your entire posterior chain (the muscles on the back of your body), especially your lower back, hamstrings, and glutes.

How to Do It: 

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell facing the landmine attachment.
  2. Stand upright holding the free end of the barbell at thigh height with both hands and your palms facing each other.
  3. Flatten your back and lower the weight toward the floor in a straight line while keeping your legs mostly straight, allowing your butt to move backward as you descend.
  4. Once you feel a stretch in your hamstrings, bend your knees slightly more and continue lowering the weight until your lower back begins to round.
  5. Reverse the movement and return to an upright position.

3. Landmine Push Press

The landmine push press is a great exercise for developing full-body power and muscle.

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell facing the landmine attachment.
  2. Hold the free end of the barbell in your right hand in front of your right shoulder, with your palm facing inward.
  3. Dip at the knees and explosively extend your hips, pressing the barbell overhead. 
  4. Lower the barbell back to the starting position. 
  5. Once you’ve performed the desired number of reps, repeat on the other side.

4. Landmine Rotations

Landmine rotations, or “landmine rainbows,” allow you to progressively overload your core and obliques, making them an effective exercise for strengthening your entire midsection. 

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell facing the landmine attachment.
  2. Adopt a wide stance slightly outside shoulder-width with your toes pointing slightly out, then hoist the barbell up to chest height.
  3. Press the bar overhead, then keeping your arms straight, lower the bar toward your left hip, pivoting your right foot inward as you lower the bar.
  4. Using your core, drive the bar in an arc until it’s back overhead, then lower it toward your right hip, pivoting your left foot inward as you lower the bar.
  5. Continue to alternate from side to side for the desired number of reps.

5. Meadows Row

The Meadows row trains your entire back unilaterally (one side at a time), which is beneficial for finding and fixing muscle imbalances.

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell.
  2. Position your right foot perpendicular to the free end of the barbell and your left foot 2-to-3 feet behind your right. 
  3. Bend over at the waist until your back is almost parallel to the floor, and grab the end of the barbell with your left hand.
  4. Pull the bar until your hand touches your torso, then lower it to the starting position. 
  5. Once you’ve completed the desired number of reps, repeat on your right side.

6. Landmine Reverse Lunge

The landmine reverse lunge trains your entire lower body, especially your quadriceps and glutes. It also trains your body unilaterally, which can help you establish a stronger mind-muscle connection because you have less to focus on, and may enhance athletic performance more than bilateral exercises (exercises that train both sides of your body simultaneously).

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell.
  2. Position your feet perpendicular to the free end of the barbell, with your right foot closer to the barbell’s end than your left.
  3. Grab the free end of the barbell in your right hand with an overhand grip and stand upright.
  4. Step back about 2-to-3 feet with your right leg, placing most of your weight on your front leg.
  5. Lower your body by bending both knees until your right knee touches the floor.
  6. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position. 
  7. Once you’ve completed the desired number of reps, repeat on your left side.

7. Landmine Overhead Press

The landmine overhead press trains the shoulders, upper back, and triceps. The diagonal pressing bar path also makes it more comfortable for those with shoulder issues.

How to Do It:

  1. Stand at the free end of the barbell facing the landmine attachment.
  2. Hold the barbell in your right hand in front of your right shoulder, with your palm facing inward. 
  3. Press the weight overhead until your arm is straight.
  4. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position.
  5. Once you’ve completed the desired number of reps, repeat on your left side.

8. Landmine Single-Arm Floor Press

The landmine single-arm floor press trains several upper-body muscle groups, including the pecs, shoulders, and triceps. It’s particularly effective for developing “lockout strength,” which may help you lift more weight on exercises like the bench and overhead press.

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and lie with the free end of the barbell next to your right shoulder.
  2. Grab the free end of the barbell in your right hand with your palm facing inward.
  3. While holding the weight, position your right arm so your right elbow is 4-to-6 inches from your side, your right triceps is in contact with the floor, your right forearm is vertical, and you’re supporting the weight.
  4. Press the barbell straight over your chest until your right arm is straight and your elbow is locked. 
  5. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position.

9. Landmine Row

The landmine row is cut from the same cloth as the T-bar row, except you can do it without a T-bar row machine, making it a good alternative for people training in a home gym

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment.
  2. Straddle the barbell (facing away from the landmine attachment) and hook a V-bar handle under the free end of the barbell. 
  3. Grab the handles, straighten your back, and slightly straighten your legs to support the weight.
  4. Keeping your back mostly stationary, pull the bar toward your chest until the weight plate touches your body.
  5. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position.

10. Landmine Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

This exercise focuses on the hamstrings and glutes while challenging your balance and stability.

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell.
  2. Position your feet perpendicular to the free end of the barbell, with your right foot closer to the barbell’s end than your left.
  3. Grab the free end of the barbell in your right hand with an overhand grip and stand upright.
  4. Flatten your back and lower the weight toward the floor in a straight line by pushing your butt backward, keeping your left leg mostly straight and extending your right leg behind you. 
  5. Once you feel a stretch in your left hamstring, bend your left knee slightly more and continue lowering the weight until your lower back begins to round.
  6. Reverse the movement and return to an upright position.
  7. Once you’ve completed the desired number of reps, switch sides and repeat the process.

11. Landmine Lateral Raise

The landmine lateral raise is one of the best isolation exercises for the side delts. Developing the side delts is vital for developing the “capped” look many want. 

How to Do It:

  1. Place one end of a barbell in a landmine attachment and stand at the free end of the barbell.
  2. Position your feet perpendicular to the free end of the barbell, with your right foot closer to the barbell’s end than your left.
  3. Grab the free end of the barbell in your right hand with an overhand grip and hold it in front of your thighs.
  4. While keeping a slight bend in your right elbow, raise the barbell out to your right side until your upper arm is slightly above parallel to the floor.
  5. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position.
  6. Once you’ve completed the desired number of reps, repeat on your left side.

Landmine Alternatives

If a standard landmine attachment isn’t available, you can still perform landmine exercises with a bit of creativity. Here are some inventive ways to set up a makeshift landmine station:

Tennis Ball Method

Cut a straight line around half the circumference of a tennis ball.

Place the cut tennis ball on one end of the barbell and position it in the corner of a room. This acts as a makeshift cushion, allowing the barbell to pivot smoothly while protecting the walls and floor.

Corner and Weight Plate Technique

Place the end of a barbell in the corner of a room or power rack, then secure it by positioning a heavy weight plate over it where it meets the floor or rack. 

Consider wrapping a towel around the barbell or plate to avoid damaging the wall or floor, then use the barbell as you would in regular landmine exercises. 

Sandbag Anchor

Lay a sturdy bag filled with sand on the ground and nestle one end of a barbell into it. The weight and flexibility of the sandbag will hold the barbell in place while allowing it to pivot.

FAQ #1: Are landmines a good workout? 

Yes.

Landmine exercises allow you to lift heavy weights safely and progress regularly, making them ideal for gaining muscle and strength. 

You can also adapt many landmine exercises to various fitness levels, making them suitable for both beginners and advanced athletes. Additionally, the arc-like bar path of landmine exercises is joint-friendly, reducing the risk of injury while still ensuring an effective workout.

FAQ #2: What body part do landmines work?

You can use landmine exercises to train your entire body.

Additionally, some barbell landmine exercises, such as landmine presses, squats, and deadlifts, allow you to train most major muscle groups in your body simultaneously, making them a time-efficient way to train.

FAQ #3: Can you build muscle with landmine exercises?

Yes.

Landmine exercises allow you to progressively overload your muscles, which is critical for gaining muscle. 

They also allow you to train your muscles through different ranges of motion than regular barbell exercises, promoting balanced and complete growth.





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